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Here are the business leaders who are — and aren’t — officially advising Trump

Business Leaders Meet With President Obama At The White House

From immigration to climate change, President Donald Trump has repeatedly found himself at odds with some of the country’s corporate leaders — including those who advise him.

As those political rifts have intensified, however, many of the top executives who had hoped to shape the new administration’s thinking have instead bolted for the exits.

The latest breaks came Monday, after Ken Frazier, the chief executive of Merck, Kevin Plank, the leader of Under Armour, and Brian Krzanich, the CEO of Intel, announced separately that they would cease advising Trump as a member of his manufacturing initiative. It’s one of two major business-facing advisory groups maintained by the president.

“I have already made clear my abhorrence at the recent hate-spawned violence in Charlottesville, and earlier today I called on all leaders to condemn the white supremacists and their ilk who marched and committed violence,” Krzanich said in a late-Monday blog post.

“I resigned because I want to make progress, while many in Washington seem more concerned with attacking anyone who disagrees with them,” Krzanich continued. “We should honor — not attack — those who have stood up for equality and other cherished American values. I hope this will change, and I remain willing to serve when it does.”

In departing, Krzanich, Frazier and Plank follow the likes of Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX and Tesla, and Bob Iger, the leader of Disney, two executives who previously ceased advising Trump because of his stances on other controversial policy issues. For its part, the White House does not maintain an updated, public list of its corporate advisers. But here’s who still assists Trump — and who has left his advisory groups.

Who’s out

President Trump Meets With Intel CEO Brian KrzanichPresident Trump Meets With Intel CEO Brian Krzanich
President Trump Meets With Intel CEO Brian Krzanich

CEO, Intel Corporation
Role: Former participant in the manufacturing initiative
Why he joined: Intel is closely monitoring Trump’s work on tax and trade policies, including the president’s approach to countries including China. To curry favor with the White House, Krzanich personally sought to give Trump credit for a major hiring and investment pledge that Intel set in motion long before Election Day. And remember, Krzanich almost held a Trump fundraiser during the 2016 presidential campaign, but opted against it due to political pressure. (The Intel chief said he thought it was a conversation about policy.)
Why he left: Days after the Charlottesville incident, Krzanich blamed politics: “I am not a politician. I am an engineer who has spent most of his career working in factories that manufacture the world’s most advanced devices. Yet, it is clear even to me that nearly every issue is now politicized to the point where significant progress is impossible. Promoting American manufacturing should not be a political issue.”

Business Leaders Meet With President Obama At The White HouseBusiness Leaders Meet With President Obama At The White House
Business Leaders Meet With President Obama At The White House

Ken Frazier

CEO, Merck & Co., Inc.
Role: Former member of the manufacturing initiative
Why he joined: Among other reasons, Trump spent the early days of his presidency slamming the likes of Merck for high drug prices.
Why he’s out: Frazier specifically cited the White House’s response to the incident in Charlottesville on August 12.

President Trump Holds Listening Session With Business LeadersPresident Trump Holds Listening Session With Business Leaders
President Trump Holds Listening Session With Business Leaders

Kevin Plank

Founder, CEO, chairman, Under Armour
Role: Former member of the manufacturing initiative
Why he’s there: Plank, like other executives, has previously praised the president. “To have such a pro-business president is something that is a real asset for the country,” he told CNBC. But the comments drew a rebuke from his own employees, leading Plank to take out a full-page advertisement in his local newspaper to explain his thinking.
Why he’s out: Hours after Frazier, Plank left the president’s manufacturing council. He didn’t mention Charlestonville in a statement, tweeted by his company, but did cite the importance of “unity, diversity and inclusion.” He added: “However, Under Armour engages in innovation and sports, not politics.”

Elon MuskElon Musk
Elon Musk

Founder and CEO of SpaceX and Tesla
Role: Former member of the Strategic and Policy Forum and manufacturing initiative
Why he joined: Musk had much to gain in the nation’s capital, from lucrative contracts at NASA for his SpaceX rockets to government support for his proposed hyperloop.
Why he’s out: Musk had hoped to use his participation on both councils to press Trump on immigration and climate change, but he opted to cease advising the president after the United States withdrew from the Paris climate agreement.

Disney CEO Bob IgerDisney CEO Bob Iger
Disney CEO Bob Iger

CEO of Disney
Role: Former member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why he joined: “I made a decision that I thought was in the best interests of our company and of our industry, to have an opportunity to express points of view directly to the president of the United States and to his administration,” Iger previously said. He stressed his participation didn’t meant he “endorse[d]” any of Trump’s policies, even though lower corporate tax rates certainly wouldn’t hurt Disney.
Why he’s out: For Iger, it was because of the Paris climate agreement.

A photo of Uber CEO Travis KalanickA photo of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick
A photo of Uber CEO Travis Kalanick

Now-former CEO of Uber
Role: Former member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why he joined: Kalanick, then Uber’s chief executive, had been a late addition to Trump’s Strategic and Policy Forum. “We partner around the world optimistically in the belief that by speaking up and engaging we can make a difference. Our experience is that not doing so shortchanges cities and the people who live in them,” he explained of his decision to join.
Why he’s out: Again, still serving as CEO, Kalanick faced a massive backlash from his own employees, and his departure marked the first of a few to come from Trump’s council.

Who’s in

President Trump Holds Policy Forum With Business LeadersPresident Trump Holds Policy Forum With Business Leaders
President Trump Holds Policy Forum With Business Leaders

Jamie Dimon

CEO of JPMorgan Chase
Role: Member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why he’s a member: Dimon has been fairly critical of Trump, but when asked earlier this year whether he would stop advising him, the top banking exec said: “I believe he’s the pilot flying our airplane. We’re trying to help. I would try to help any president of the United States because I’m a patriot. We do not — it does not mean we agree with all the policies that the administration comes up with.”

Steven Schwarzman

CEO of Blackstone
Role: Member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why he’s a member: Schwarzman didn’t just join Trump’s business council; he currently chairs it. “Steve called me up the day after the election — it might have even been the same night, Jamie, to be honest with you,” Trump recalled at their inaugural meeting. “And he said, I’d like to put together a group of world-class leaders and that’s what he’s done. So good job, Steve.”

Rich Lesser

CEO of Boston Consulting Group
Role: Member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why he’s a member: “Our participation in the forum provides an opportunity and a responsibility to engage directly with the president on critical issues important to the United States and our world,” a spokesman previously said.

Tech And Media Elites Attend Allen And Company Annual Meetings In IdahoTech And Media Elites Attend Allen And Company Annual Meetings In Idaho
Tech And Media Elites Attend Allen And Company Annual Meetings In Idaho

Doug McMillon

President and CEO, Walmart
Role: Member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why he’s a member: McMillon is one of the chief executives who opposed Trump’s move on the Paris agreement but chose to remain a member of his advisory board anyway. Walmart, of course, has plenty on the line in Washington, D.C., including major tax and labor policy battles.

President Donald Trump Leads A Strategic And Policy CEO DiscussionPresident Donald Trump Leads A Strategic And Policy CEO Discussion
President Donald Trump Leads A Strategic And Policy CEO Discussion

Indra Nooyi

Chairperson and CEO of PepsiCo
Role: Member of the Strategic and Policy Forum
Why she’s there: On one hand, Nooyi previously acknowledged that Trump’s election didn’t sit well with many of her employees. “Our employees were all crying,” the CEO said. “And the question that…

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